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Category: Social (Media) Economics

Rising Utilitarianism in Decision Making: Cause Marketing

Rising Utilitarianism in Decision Making: Cause Marketing

More so than ever before, we are seeing businesses adopt causes as core components of both their business and marketing strategies. Cause marketing is nothing new. Examples of truly integrated cause marketing go as far back as the 70s. What we’re seeing today, however, is a shift in the way causes are being integrated into the missions of businesses; this holds particularly true for businesses that try to appeal to millennials (and often succeed). Let’s start with first taking a…

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Rising Utilitarianism in Decision Making: The Sharing Economy

Rising Utilitarianism in Decision Making: The Sharing Economy

The sharing economy has experienced explosive growth, and while it might be largely self-serving on an individual level, it has created an environment that betters the greater good. Welcome back to a new edition of my study of the rise of utilitarianism in decision making processes and economies adopted by the modern consumer (often referred to as millennials, but that’s not giving modern consumers enough credit). In this article, I plan to explore some of the inner workings of the…

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The Unintended Rise of Utilitarianism in Decision Making (Part 1)

The Unintended Rise of Utilitarianism in Decision Making (Part 1)

Whether or not we meant for it to happen, utilitarianism has become a driving factor in the decision-making process. Millennials are often regarded as being self-absorbed, lazy and entitled. Vanity and the pursuit of perceived perfection have led to the presumption that millennials and, more broadly, the consumer market in general (for the most part) is entirely self-centered. It is easy to see why that way of thinking has become commonplace. All of the superficial elements are there to support the…

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Here’s How LinkedIn Can Save Itself

Here’s How LinkedIn Can Save Itself

There are a few important changes LinkedIn needs to make in order to save itself from a disastrous fate. If you happened to catch a glimpse of LinkedIn’s stock price over the last week or so, you might have noticed a straight line downwards on Friday February 5th. That wasn’t a glitch; LinkedIn’s stock price has fallen by over 40% (at the time of writing) since it announced lower-than-expected earnings and lowered projections for the coming year. Investors are losing…

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Brand Trust is on the Rise

Brand Trust is on the Rise

Every year, Edelman releases the Edelman Trust Barometer, and for the first time in a long time, consumers are starting to trust in brands again. The Edelman Trust Barometer (embedded below from SlideShare) was first released in 2001, and its purpose has consistently been to show the state of trust of the average consumer (globally) in different bodies. Those bodies range from governments to NGOs to, most recently added, ‘a person like me’. When this last one was added, we…

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Thinking About the Future of Social Networking as a Marketer

Thinking About the Future of Social Networking as a Marketer

We might not have a crystal ball, but one thing we can be certain of is that there will be a lot of changes in the future of social networking. Marketers are always trying to predict the future. We always aim to be on top of whatever’s trending and find a way to (creatively) hijack the medium for our own (or our clients’) benefit. But more often than not, the reality is that by the time the majority of marketers…

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Why Businesses Are Wasting Their Time Fighting the Share Economy

Why Businesses Are Wasting Their Time Fighting the Share Economy

The share economy is here to stay, and businesses should stop wasting their time trying to fight it. In the 1920s, H. Armstrong Roberts founded one of the first stock photography agencies. This started a trend whereby companies of the sort would build stockpiles of images and sell their rights to individuals looking to use them. By the late 1980s and early 1990s, Getty and Corbis ruled the marketplace, and essentially had the luxury of setting their own prices –…

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